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Artist Focus 17: Misdirect Movies

Misdirect Movies focuses on the impact of digital technologies in film and the visual arts and how the digital is forging revolutionary changes in making art and its presentations. The artists’ use of appropriation and the principles of collage have become a dominant force when working with cinema as a source material. The digital revolution has re-opened artists’ questioning of the materiality and non-material nature of the medium of collage.
The exhibition has developed from the research interests and artworks of the curators, Andrew Bracey and John Rimmer. All the selected artists explore these ideas in diverse ways to work with narrative and new forms of materiality. The exhibition features a wide range of media, from projections and monitor-based work through to digital prints, painting and even a microfiche viewer.
The curators are both artists and lecturers: Andrew Bracey is programme leader of MA Fine Art and Contemporary Curatorial Practice at the University of Lincoln and Dr John Rimmer is the academic coordinator of the BA Visual Arts at Bishop Grosseteste University.
Misdirect Movies explores new possibilities of collage using material gleaned from cinema bridging the analogue and the digital. It also focuses on the impact of digital technologies in film and the visual arts and how the digital is forging revolutionary changes in making art and its presentations. The exhibition has developed from the research interests and artworks of the curators, Andrew Bracey and John Rimmer. All the selected artists explore these ideas in diverse ways to work with narrative and new forms of materiality.
Artists
Rosa Barba who is currently based in Berlin has produced a Printed Cinema. This series of artist’s books has been published alongside her film projects, as a form of secondary literature, sourced from film stills, text and photographs.
Manchester based artist Dave Griffiths’ recent work dwells on the physical and fictive borders of cinema. He employs projectionist’s cue dot to activate the narrative potential of marginal images.
Cathy Lomax keeps an ongoing visual diary of all the films that she has watched, selecting one image from each to make into a small, rapidly executed painting.
Elizabeth McAlpine is based in London and works with measured enquiry. She has compiled film footage of Nicolas Roeg’s cult thriller Don’t Look Now from each time that a person blinked during their viewing of the film.
David Reed is a New York based painter whose work refers to film and photography. The Searchers animation references John Ford’s western and recalls an earlier personal experience where the artist had accidently discovered a cave used in the actual film.
 
The exhibition has received funding from Arts Council England.
Tune in to their news: www.misdirectmovies.co.uk

September 27, 2013 on Blog, News updates

Artist Focus 16: Justin Blinder

Justin Blinder is a Brooklyn-based media artist, programmer, and designer. His work examines how our claims of ownership, criteria for an object’s value, and ways of interacting with others have changed in the digital landscape. Justin’s projects aim to simultaneously provide usable tools and a critical analytical lens, sparking dialogues on how technology and digitization shape our social behaviors. His project Dumpster Drive, a file-sharing application that recycles digital files, helped to build a networked community of users around the ubiquitous, but understudied, digital process of deleting. 
Justin’s projects have received attention from media outlets such as the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, the BBC, the Guardian, and Gizmodo. Justin holds a BFA in Design and Technology from Parsons the New School for Design. In the past, Justin has worked as a team developer on the open source project ShiftSpace, served as a Research Resident at Uncommon Projects, and was recently a Resident Technologist at EDesign Labs. Justin is currently the Creative Technologist at Sub Rosa, and an Honorary Fellow at Eyebeam Art and Technology Center.
Wi-Fi spotting
Using NYC.gov wireless hotspot data, Wi-Fi Spotting topographically visualizes Wi-Fi saturation in the metropolis.
Taking inspiration from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, the piece questions what is imagined, and what is real, when exploring the physical formation of digital networks. The meta-data of our wireless signals float off of us along specific routes like those on a map, but the structures and architecture of our communications and technologies—our virtual skyline—are not usually seen. By highlighting how our immediate environments are saturated by other’s signals, as part of an on-going revolution of white noise, Wi-Fi Spotting aims to prompt viewers to think about the underlying social contracts hidden in geographic datasets.
At first glance, there is nothing inherently revolutionary about digital files, but once we examine the history of media digitization, the liberatory potential of data to defy their original forms becomes apparent. Casting a critical lens on our digital files raises our awareness of how states govern and surveil data, and what the power dynamics between everyday citizens, corporations, and states should look like. His projects aim to ferment such potential revolutions by harnessing digital excess— the white noise that surrounds us. The binary code of our deleted files, the components rusting in discarded printers that litter the streets, and our ignored search histories contain the seeds of future, heretofore unrecognized changes.
 
Wi-Fi Spotting is part of the Where are we now? exhibition opening 14th September 2013 and running until 12th January 2014 at The Collection.
 Tune in to Justin’s news: www.justinblinder.com
Follow him: @justinblinder
More videos: vimeo.com/justinblinder

September 27, 2013 on Blog, News updates

Artist Focus 15: Graham Cooper

Senior Lecturer at the University of Lincoln, specialising in Digital Media, Graham is also an active digital content creator, producing a wide variety of outputs predominantly used for marketing and promotional purposes. He has been collaborating with audio producer David McSherry on a number of projects ever since 2011, where they produced the promo trailer for the first Frequency Festival.
Graham’s most recent projects include the production of digital set design for a staging of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials at the Royal and Derngate theatre in Northampton, and the creation of 2013’s Cinema advert for the University of Lincoln.
Frequency Festival 2013 promotional animated trailer

In 2011, Graham produced the animated trailer promoting Lincoln’s first digital culture festival, and has returned again this year to do the same. Collaborating with David Mcsherry once again, this year’s work has a familiar yet fresh style and feel. The trailer in particular was influenced by the idea of a ‘Call to arms’, intended to stir the audience into action.
In 2011 Graham produced the visuals onto which David supplied the soundtrack. This year, David produced the audio initially, to which Graham responded. The old switcheroo.
Tune in to Graham’s news: jayumcooper.co.uk
Follow him: @jayumcooper 

September 26, 2013 on Blog, News updates